Terrebonne Parish

TEDA SEEKING COMPANIES SEVERELY IMPACTED BY HURRICANE BARRY

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TEDA, in conjunction with Louisiana Economic Development, has begun assessing the impact of Hurricane Barry. These efforts will inform the decisions of any local, state, or federal programs in place to assist businesses with recovery.

Please contact TEDA at 873-6890 or message us with contact information if any of the below issues are affecting your business:

 ·     Commercial or industrial property damage due to rain, wind, or flooding;

·     Continued loss of utility services such as electricity, internet or phone;

·     Long-term interruption of operations; or

·     Unresolved issues with access to workforce related to the storm.

 We wish to help heighten awareness of your company's situation with service providers and potentially help restore your business to full functionality.

Also, please share with us an estimate of the financial damage caused to your company. This information is vitally important for garnering potential business assistance funds that may come available, as well as allowing TEDA to lend its aid at this time.

Emails can be sent to info@tpeda.org or ktheriot@tpeda.org. Staff will follow up with you as soon as possible.

Thank you.

Terrebonne Coastal Day to showcase progress

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Updates on coastal restoration and flood protection projects in Terrebonne Parish will be featured at Wednesday’s Coastal Day in Houma.

Local, state and federal officials as well as industry leaders will congregate at the Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center to participate in panel discussions about the progress being made in the parish.

“If anyone’s interested in getting an up-close and personal look at our structures, our levees and meet some of the people who helped make it happen, I think it would be a great opportunity to do that,” said Angela Hidalgo, administrative manager for the Terrebonne Levee and Conservation District.

The levee district and parish government are putting on the event. The first interactive showcase in 2017 drew about 750 people, including people from neighboring parishes, said Hidalgo.

“The first time we did it, we had no idea it was going to be such a success,” she said, adding the event may be unique in the state.

While Coastal Day will run from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. with the first panel discussion taking place around 5 p.m., a few other events are planned earlier in the day.

The Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority plans to have its monthly meeting at 9:30 a.m. in the civic center, which is open to the public.

Then, the new $35 million floodgate at Falgout Canal will be dedicated to the late Jimmy Dagate at a public ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Dagate served as the attorney for the Terrebonne Parish Economic Development Authority, Terrebonne Parish Housing Authority and levee district. Gov. John Bel Edwards will speak at the dedication.

The event will include drone video footage recorded in the last two weeks, showcasing the different projects. People will have the chance to look at more in-depth closeups and stand next to a life-size model of a levee.

For information, visit www.tpcg.org.

Staff Writer Halle Parker can be reached at hparker@houmatoday.com or 857-2204. Follow her on Twitter, @_thehalparker.

Unique new event runs the levees April 7

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HT Sports launches Louisiana Run for the Wetlands

HOUMA – While South Louisiana is known for marshes and wetlands, opportunities to experience the environment can be limited… until now! On Sunday, April 7, Terrebonne Economic Development Authority (TEDA) is opening the levee and wildlife-preserve gates in Montegut to runners and walkers who want to take in the scenic wetlands. The Louisiana Run for the Wetlands is the first event in TEDA’s HT Sports initiative and features a semi-guided 5K, 10K, half-marathon and bird-watching walk.

Winding through wetlands that comprise one of the most-rapidly eroding estuaries/ecosystems on the earth, participants can learn about the initiatives being undertaken to manage water, preserve and restore the wetlands, and protect the species residing therein. After finishing the route, enjoy the sights, sounds and cultural tastes associated with life in Bayou Country.

The trail route, edging along the 35,000-acre Pointe-aux-Chenes Wildlife Management Area, runs along drainage levees and part of the 72-mile Morganza-to-the-Gulf Hurricane Protection levee system. It offers stunning views of marsh stretches, wetlands terracing projects, coastal vegetation, water-management tools like sluice gates and pump stations, and beautiful waterfowl and animals that call one of the rapidly-eroding estuaries home.

This family-friendly event will feature informational booths on local wildlife and cultures, coastal preservation and restoration projects, and water management strategies. Cultural vendors (those showcasing local culture or culturally-tied arts and crafts) are welcome; interested parties should visit www.tpeda.org for a vendor registration form or email ktheriot@tpeda.org.

The Louisiana Run for the Wetlands kicks off at 8 a.m. Sunday, April 7, at Recreation District 6, 104 Dolphin St. in Montegut, after a blessing from nearby Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Come prepared – insect repellent, binoculars, cameras, hats and sunscreen are encouraged.

Funds raised will benefit Restore the Earth, which has a restoration project in Pointe-Aux-Chenes.

For registration and information, visit http://www.louisianarunforthewetlands.com or https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaRunForTheWetlands/.

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Contact: Matthew Rookard, TEDA CEO; 985-873-6890

Companies sought for free 2019 CEO program

Local businessman touts efficiencies learned

Applications are being accepted through March 30 in the Bayou Region for the CEO Roundtable program. It brings together key decision makers 10 times a year to collaborate in a trusted environment to grow their businesses.

The free program, presented by Louisiana Economic Development, will begin meeting in July at Fletcher Technical Community College on La. 311. It offers peer-to-peer learning through discussion, interaction and sharing of experiences with qualified facilitators, expert guest speakers and connections to various small business resources.

“I highly recommend it, especially for those who think they don’t have time to do it,” said Jason Bergeron, partner of Technology Professionals in Houma. “The efficiencies and information you pick up in peer-to-peer conversations pay for time invested. You’re able to take information from each session and apply it to increased earning potential of your company immediately.”

To qualify, applicants must be a CEO, business owner or key decision maker in a company that has between 5 and 100 employees, approximate annual revenue between $600,000-$50,000,000 and the potential to serve customers outside the local area. High-growth potential companies will be given additional consideration.

For more information or to apply, visit OpportunityLouisiana.com/CEO-Roundtables or contact Darrell Johnson at 225-342-4680 or Darrell.johnson2@la.gov. Questions can also be directed to Katherine Theriot at Terrebonne Economic Development at 985-873-6890.

Report forecasts uptick in Gulf oilfield

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The Gulf of Mexico will see an increase in drilling this year for the first time since an oil bust began in mid-2014, a new forecast says.

“We expect 2019 to be a strong year for the Gulf of Mexico,” William Turner, senior research analyst at the global energy consulting firm Wood Mackenzie, said in a news release. “In addition to exciting new project sanctions, which could usher in more than $10 billion of investment into the region, a couple of historic firsts set to occur next year could set the stage for years to come.”

Whether that translates into new jobs for Houma-Thibodaux, and how many, remains uncertain. But the report from the prominent consulting firm is among the most optimistic since a global crude glut sent oil prices plunging, stripping more than 16,000 jobs from the area’s offshore-oil-based economy.

Shell and Chevron will lead the way, but the actual growth in exploration will come from new entrants, Wood Mckenzie says in its report, “US Gulf of Mexico: 5 things to look for in 2019.” They include companies such as Kosmos Energy, Equinor, Total, Murphy and Fieldwood.

Two major projects serve as bellwethers for the Gulf overall, according to the report, released in mid-December.

-- Chevron’s Anchor project, about 140 miles south of the Gulf oilfield service hub at Port Fourchon, is poised for a final investment decision this year. If approved, it would be the first project using new ultra-high-pressure technology to reach that stage, the result of more than two decades of industry research and development.

“Anchor will be an important one to watch,” Turner said. “The sanction of Anchor will be a significant milestone for Chevron, Total and Venari but also marks a crucial point for the offshore industry as it enters the final frontier in deepwater development.”

Success at Anchor will lead to the next wave of mega-investment in the Gulf, as several other projects using the same technology are waiting to follow its lead. Wood Mackenzie predicts that if Anchor moves forward, more than $10 billion of investment could flow into the region.

-- Shell’s Appomattox development, about 200 miles southeast of Port Fourchon, is set to begin producing oil and gas this year. It will be the Gulf’s first production from a Jurassic reservoir, high-quality oil in sediments that date back about 150 million years. It also required new technology to reach greater depths at higher pressures.

“If the Jurassic roars to life in 2019, it could give operators greater confidence in the play’s potential,” Turner said. “However, if Appomattox disappoints, the Jurassic could continue to lie dormant. The wider region would also be missing an expected strong production growth contributor.”

The report is one of several that predict an uptick this year in the Gulf oilfield. All hinge, in large part, on what happens to oil prices, which are notoriously volatile and difficult to predict, with analysts’ estimates varying widely.

Louisiana economist Loren Scott’s annual economic forecast, released in late September, projects the Houma-Thibodaux metro area, comprised of Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes, will gain 700 jobs, 0.8 percent, this year. It will add another 2,100 jobs, 2.4 percent, in 2020, driven largely by gains in oil and gas. Scott’s forecast is based on oil rising from an average of $65 a barrel in 2018 to $80 a barrel by 2020.

U.S. crude ended 2018 at about $45 a barrel, down 25 percent, the first annual loss since 2015. The trend was similar for Brent, which ended the year at $54 a barrel, down 20 percent. Both ended last week about $3 higher.

In its annual forecast, the LSU Center for Energy Studies predicts increased activity this year but says in the short term the Gulf rig count will remain around 20, where it has been for months.

The Gulf Coast Energy Outlook, released in November, tempers its forecast for offshore job growth by noting what other economists and analysts have said for years. Specifically, it says companies have cut costs through innovation and efficiency, including increased automation and the use of tiebacks that run pipelines from sub-sea wells to existing platforms rather than building new ones.

“This is great news in terms of making the Gulf of Mexico more competitive for future production by lowering costs per barrel of production,” the report says. “However, these productivity gains also mean that fewer workers are needed for a given level of production.”

-- Executive Editor Keith Magill can be reached at 857-2201 or keith.magill@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter @CourierEditor.

Local oilfield service company adds 150 workers

Two major contracts in the Gulf of Mexico have prompted a local oilfield-service company to hire 150 new workers, officials said today.

Danos, based in Gray, says it has secured a contract to provide production workers to Equinor’s Titan platform, which operates in nearly 4,000 feet of water about 60 miles southeast of the offshore service hub at Port Fourchon.

The project, which began late last year, is Danos’ second with Equinor after it was awarded a contract for coatings maintenance on the Titan platform in the fall.

“Danos is excited for the opportunity to work with a high-performing company like Equinor,” owner Paul Danos said in a news release. “Securing and executing the details of the contract has been a true team effort, and we look forward to continuing our commitment to customer service and excellence.”

The company has also been awarded a multi-year contract for production operations with another major oil and gas producer in the Gulf, though company officials would not discuss specifics.

Danos has increased its production workforce by about 150 new employees as a result of the contracts. Most of the new positions are production operators who will be working on the Gulf Coast, with projects spanning from Galveston, Texas, to Venice, La.

“Danos’ ability to provide a recruiting and retention model for competent and skilled workers heavily influenced both contracts,” Danos said. “I commend Danos’ operations team, as well as our human resources team who worked closely with our customers’ operations and procurement teams to make both projects possible.”

Danos, which employs about 2,200 people, is the largest private employer in Terrebonne Parish.

Equinor, based in Norway with U.S. headquarters in Houston, owns 100 percent of the Titan operation and part of 10 others in the Gulf. Its operations there produce about 100,000 barrels of oil per day, and the company says planned growth will make it the fifth-largest producer in the Gulf by 2020.

-- Executive Editor Keith Magill can be reached at 857-2201 or keith.magill@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter@CourierEditor.

Program can help train workers in farm and seafood industries - - Workers' dependents may also qualify for assistance

HOUMA – Those who work on farms or harvesting seafood – even if seasonal workers -- may qualify for a program to increase their skill sets to benefit their current or future employers. These workers can also potentially receive vouchers to help meet daily living expenses such as gasoline, groceries, supplies and uniforms.

The program aims to aid those in lower-income agriculture and aquaculture jobs reach their goals to earn higher wages. Half of a person’s income must be earned through farm or seafood work to qualify for the Motivation Education & Training (MET), Inc., program, funded through the National Farmworker Jobs Program and U.S. Department of Labor; income limits do apply.

Therefore, a company can identify the training workers need and if workers meet income requirements, they may receive up to 10 weeks of training in those areas. Training may include industry-specific equipment or processing skills; or classes in English as a second language or computer technology, toward a GED, CDL or other certification.

Those workers wishing to change careers may receive medical or dental training, or classes to become a service technician or business-office worker.

Individuals wishing to supplement their farm income or change careers could train in other areas as well, and a stipend may be available to aid with living expenses during training. A qualifying worker’s dependent could also be eligible for career training and other benefits. Career counseling, job-placement and other services are also available.

For more information or to apply, call Nash Pitre at 985-858-2894 or email houma@metinc.org.

SUNO SURVEY

Researchers from Southern University of New Orleans are seeking local businesses’ input about what programs or assistance have helped business recover quickly in prior flooding events, or what ideas you have that could help your business (or others) return to productivity quickly in future floods. They plan to compile the suggestions to help shape future policies and programs.

Please fill out the questionnaire, scan and email to ktheriot@tpeda.org for submission to SUNO. You are encouraged to add a page for further suggestions.

Jump Start provides job-ready workers

Employers in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes can easily find new employees educated through local schools as part of the state’s Jump Start career pathway program.

“Say you’re a retailer looking to increase your staff for the holiday shopping season. Wouldn’t it be nice to hire a young person for evening shifts who has some training in customer service?” the Terrebonne Economic Development Authority said in a news release.

Terrebonne Parish public school students earned more than 3,000 certifications by their 2018 graduation, TEDA said.

Jump Start is Louisiana’s career and technical education program that aims to begin career training while students are still in high school, allowing them to earn industry-based certifications and a career diploma.

High school student are earning certifications in the areas of automotive, health care, food service, web design, emergency medical services, construction, carpentry, electrical, welding, transportation, agriculture, business and more.

“These Jump Start career diplomas give students a level of knowledge in these areas, offering companies new options when hiring entry-level staff and providing students skills sets upon which they can build through their career or further education,” TEDA said.

In 2018, TEDA said, about 42 percent of Terrebonne graduates, or 480 students, received 3,361 certifications. Next May, the system anticipates graduating about another 450 with certifications.

TEDA is organizing a spring job fair to help the pending graduates. Call 873-6890 for information about Jump Start graduates or if your company is interested in participating in the job fair.

Employers: Look for certifications when hiring entry-level staff

Terrebonne Parish Public School Students earned more than 3,000 certifications by their 2018 graduation.

HOUMA, October 17, 2018 – It’s an HR manager’s dream: Finding a low-cost way of assessing an applicant’s skill sets and training.

Luckily, employers have a new tool they can use when hiring entry-level employees, being brought to the hiring community via the Jump Start career pathway program.

Jump Start is Louisiana’s career and technical education program which aims to begin career training while students are still in high school, allowing them to earn industry-based certifications and culminating their high-school career with a Career Diploma. The program sets the students up to enter the workforce and/or continue their education with a head start on skill sets needed by employers.

Say you’re a retailer looking to increase your staff for the holiday shopping season: wouldn’t it be nice to hire a young person for evening shifts who has some training in customer service? The Jump Start program offers a Customer Service and Sales certification – and students across Terrebonne Parish are testing for the certification this fall.

But Customer Service and Sales is only one of the certifications available to students. Terrebonne Parish School students can earn several of the following in their junior and senior years:

• Adobe Certified Associate Photoshop

• ASE Automotive certifications (auto body/collision and repair technology/technician, drive train and axels, electrical/electronics, engine performance and repair, heating/air conditioning, maintenance/light repair, steering/suspension, and transmission/transaxel)

• ASE Welding Level 1

• Certified Nursing Assistant

• Certified Restaurant Server

• CIW Web Design Specialist, Network Technology Associate, Internet Business Associate

• Emergency Medical Responder

• FEMA National Incident Management System

• First Aid/CPR/AED

• Food and Beverage Executive

• Louisiana Micro-Enterprise

• Microsoft Office Specialist

• Microsoft Office Specialist Master

• MOUS Office Specialist 2010

• NCCER Core

• NCCER Carpentry Level 1 and 2

• NCCER Electrical Level 1 and 2

• NCCER Welding Level 2

• OSHA 10 General Industry

• Pro Start S/P2 Safety and Pollution Prevention

• ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certificate

• T2 Production Safety Systems

• WorkKeys (skills evaluation in applied math, graphic literacy and workplace documents

These Jump Start career diplomas give students a level of knowledge in these areas, offering companies new options when hiring entry-level staff and providing students skills sets upon which they can build through their career or further education.

College-bound students are also earning certifications in the business and production safety applications, all extremely useful as they further their education.

In fact, in its first graduating year of the various Jump Start curriculum, Terrebonne Parish School District graduates approximately 42% of its student population with a total of 3,361 certifications in 2018; that’s 480 graduates with industry-based certifications in hand. In May 2019, the system anticipates graduating approximately another 450 with certifications.

Discussion has started about conducting a job fair in Spring 2019 to help these pending graduates connect with potential employers. If your company would be interested in participating in such a job fair, please contact TEDA at 985-873-6890.

Students training for entry-level jobs

Terrebonne Economic Development Authority is touting a local school district program that aims to provide high school students with problem-solving skills and the ability to be trained to fill entry-level jobs.

The ACT WorkKeys National Career Readiness Certificate test is given to Terrebonne students on Jump Start Career Pathway tracks, some upper level English students and students who scores a 21 or less on the ACT college entrance test.

TEDA says students can earn certifications that verify proficiency in problem solving; critical thinking; reading and using work-related text; applying information from workplace documents and mathematical reasoning to solve problems; locating, synthesizing and applying information presented graphically; and comparing, summarizing and analyzing information presented in multiple graphics.

“Why is this valuable to businesses? These areas indicate students’ strength in using mathematical reasoning and problem-solving techniques to solve work-related problems,” TEDA said.

Among the skills student are taught are solving problems using mathematical skills, identifying a trend and figuring out a goal to a new situation, TEDA said.

Students with WorkKeys certificates can help employers better align their new hires’ skills with those needed for a job, TEDA said. That also translates into “shorter training times with greater knowledge retention, reduced turnover, increased performance ratings for skilled workers, improved employee morale and decreased operator error.”

Students with certification are being advised to note this on their resumes and job applications. They can be verified at http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/workkeys-for-educators/ncrc.html.

For information, call Katherine Gilbert-Theriot at TEDA at 873-6890.

Schools using test to indicate level of soft skills

HOUMA -- Are you struggling to hire entry-level employees who can show up on time and can be a trained?

The Terrebonne Parish School District is using a tool that can aid in reassuring you that the application of that high-school student or recent graduate you’re holding might be good fit for your company.

It’s the ACT WorkKeys National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC) test, and it’s given to all students who are on Jump Start Career Pathway tracks, some upper level English students and is available to any student who scores a 21 or less on the ACT. Educators say that’s approximately 50 percent of the high-school population, and TPSD covers the cost for students.

Though WorkKeys testing students can earn certifications in Applied Math, Graphic Literacy and/or Workplace Documents on four levels – bronze, silver, gold and platinum. The credentials verify skills proficiency in

• problem solving

• critical thinking

• reading and using work-related text

• applying information from workplace documents and mathematical reasoning to solve problems

• locating, synthesizing and applying information presented graphically, and

• comparing, summarizing and analyzing information presented in multiple graphics.

For example, with a gold Applied Math certificate, students demonstrate their ability to solve problems using mathematical operations with mixed units, identify where a mistake occurred in calculations, calculate percentages and use it to determine a discount, markup or tax, convert between units of measurement, and other skills.

A gold Graphic Literacy certificate indicates students can locate information in a graphic using information found in another graphic, identify a trend/pattern/relationship and justify a decision based on information, among other skills.

Regarding Workplace Documents, a gold certificate indicates the ability to infer meanings of words or phrases from context, apply instructions to a new situation similar to the one described in a document while considering changing conditions and make inferences to accomplish a goal.

Why is this valuable to businesses? These areas indicate students’ strength in using mathematical reasoning and problem-solving techniques to solve work-related problems; graphs, charts, tables, floor plans and instrument gauges; and written text to do a job. The higher the score on the WorkKeys assessment (on a scale of 3 to 7), the greater the ability.

WorkKeys certificates are tools that can help employers better align their new hires’ skills with those needed for a job. That translates into a better-quality hire, shorter training times with greater knowledge retention, reduced turnover, increased performance ratings for skilled workers, improved employee morale and decreased operator error.

How do you know if an applicant has these certifications? Their school counselors have been recommending certifications be listed on resumes, added to job application forms and certificate copies offered to potential employers. Students have also been counseled to make their certificates publicly available so employers to verify them by entering a registration number online at http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/workkeys-for-educators/ncrc.html

Want more information on WorkKeys certificates? Contact Katherine Gilbert-Theriot with Terrebonne Economic Development at 985-873-6890.

Donated barge being used for worker training

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Open enrollment is underway at South Louisiana Community College for a training program of the next generation of maritime industry workers.

Houma-based Cenac Marine donated a refurbished oil and gas tank barge last November to South Louisiana Community College for training students.

Cenac representatives met with Capt. Carl Moore, assistant dean of marine operations at South Louisiana Community College, and discovered the need for updated equipment, owner Benny Cenac Jr. said in a news release.

“From the very start of this project, I have been excited about what we can offer to the community and to those interested in becoming tankermen,” Cenac said. “My company and I are fortunate to have the opportunity to provide a hands-on learning experience to many people for years to come.”

The 158-foot-by-40-foot training vessel replicates a standard Cenac Marine Services tank barge and will be used for the training. The barge will be located at Munson Slip in Houma where South Louisiana Community College tankerman training will take place.

“The barge donated by Mr. Cenac and Cenac Marine services has been a game changer,” Moore said. “We’re excited to be able to offer hands-on, real-life experience while under the supervision of an instructor. This will help everyone in a way we just haven’t been able to in the past.”

Depending on the size of the class, hands-on barge training can last about eight hours per session. The college will offer the class every two weeks depending on instructor availability.

The program currently has two Cenac boat captains serving as instructors during their off-time, the company said. Both captains have been state certified to teach the 32-hour course.

After completion of the course, students are required to complete basic firefighting training before they can become certified tankermen.

The economic benefits of having this training tool are also vital, said Matt Rookard, CEO of the Terrebonne Economic Development Authority. Having these training partnerships and equipment in place will help in attracting more companies to the area, he said.

“The No. 1 thing that comes up in meetings with companies that want to move down here is workforce development. Before costs, before tax structure, it’s workforce development. The reason is simple. You can have the lowest costs in the world, but if you can’t get the people to do the job, then it doesn’t matter,” Rookard said.

Those interested in taking the class can register at 331 Dickson Road in Houma, where the barge is housed and the site of the college’s Terrebonne campus. It has 10 other campuses in Acadia, Evangeline, Iberia, Lafayette, Livingston, St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Mary and Vermilion parishes.

For more information about South Louisiana Community College and its Maritime training offerings, visit solacc.edu.

--Staff Writer Dan Copp can be reached at 857-2202 or at dan.copp@houmatoday.com.

Houma shipbuilder lands two major contracts

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A Houma shipbuilder has landed two new contracts as it works to rebound from a four-year offshore oil bust.

Gulf Island Fabrication will build a 245-guest riverboat for the American Steamboat Company, officials said Friday. The new paddle-wheeler, called the American Countess, will be built using the existing hull of the Kanesville Queen, a former gambling boat built in 1995. It’s expected to sail the Mississippi River starting sometime next year.

Gulf Island officials said they will report revenue and man-hours associated with the project in the company’s public financial statements for the quarter ending Sept. 30.

“We continue to break sales records and incredible demand remains for more capacity on the river with each of our boats continuing to sail full,” American Queen Steamboat Company Chairman John Waggoner said in a news release. “We look forward to collaborating with Gulf Island’s team of skilled workers and craftsmen to deliver a riverboat that will once again exceed expectations of our guests and continue raising the bar on domestic river cruising.”

The latest contract follows Gulf Island’s announcement late last month that it has finalized a deal to build a second 3300-horsepower towboat for an unnamed customer. Delivery of the second vessel is estimated two months after delivery of the first.

“We are pleased to be awarded this option for the second newbuild towboat,” Kirk Meche, Gulf Island president and CEO, said in a news release. “This work will be performed at our shipyard in Houma. ... This is yet another indication of confidence from our customers as it relates to our ability to perform and provide quality vessels.”

Gulf Island, based in Houston, is a leading fabricator of oilfield structures, including offshore platforms and ships. It also builds structures for the petrochemical and alternative energy industries. Its Houma fabrication and shipbuilding operations in Houma employ about 600 workers.

Like many oilfield service companies, Gulf Island’s business has been impacted by a four-year offshore oil bust that has stripped an estimated 16,000 jobs from the Houma-Thibodaux economy.

Meche cited some improvements in an Aug. 9 report on the company’s second-quarter financial results. The company reported net income of $500,000 on revenue of $54 million for the three months ended June 30. That compares to a net loss of $10.9 million on revenue of $45.9 million for the same period in 2017. And it’s up from the first quarter of this year, when the company posted a net loss of $5.3 million.

He cited strong performance from Gulf Island’s services division in Houma, as well as income from the sale of a fabrication yard in Ingleside, Texas, for part of the gain.

On June 6, the company landed a contract to build a second marine research vessel for Oregon State University for $67.6 million. And in March, it received a $63.6 million contract to build the first in a new class of Navy salvage, towing and rescue ships. Both projects are being built in Houma.

The company’s reported a backlog of work totaling $347.6 million as of Aug. 8, including projects through 2022.

“As of today,” Meche said in the report, “our backlog is the largest it has been in four years.”

-- Executive Editor Keith Magill can be reached at 857-2201 or keith.magill@houmatoday.com.

Congratulations to Fletcher Technical Community College for being ranked #2 on the list! Such an asset to the community!

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NEW ORLEANS — With back-to-school season upon us and a year of community college nearly three times less expensive than a year at a public four-year college, the personal-finance website WalletHub released its report on 2018’s Best & Worst Community Colleges, coupled with its state-by-state ranking of the Best & Worst Community-College Systems.

To determine where students can receive the best education at the cheapest rates, WalletHub compared 715 community colleges across 17 key indicators of cost and quality. The data set ranges from the cost of in-state tuition and fees to student-faculty ratio to graduation rate.

In Louisiana, community colleges ranked as follows:

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Houma company to build new tugboat

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A Houma-based shipyard said it’s joining forces with a New Orleans company to build the most powerful ship-assisting tugboat on the Mississippi River.

Main Iron Works announced last week it’s partnering with the New Orleans-based Bisso Towboat Inc. to build its 12th tugboat.

Bisso Towboat Inc. awarded the contract earlier this summer to Main Iron Works with plans to build a new 100-foot, 6,008-horsepower, Tier 4-compliant ASD tractor tug.

Tier 4 is a set of emissions requirements established by the Environmental Protection Agency to reduce emissions.

Construction of the vessel will begin later in the season with a projected completion date of fall 2019, the company said.

Scott Slatten, Bisso’s president, said the new tugboat will have a similar structure to the recently built vessel, the Liz Healy.

“It will be very similar structurally and from a profile to our last new build, Liz Healy, as the vast majority of the changes will be in the engine room for the SCR system and larger Z-drives and a larger bow winch and bow staple to accommodate the increased horsepower/bollard pull,” Slatten said. “Beyond that, we were able to pretty much use our existing design with some minor changes in tankage and hull and the above.”

Main Iron Works owner Arlen “Benny” Cenac Jr. said the new tugboat will be first of its kind for the company.

“We are proud to partner with Bisso as they build the most powerful ship-assist tug on the Mississippi River,” Cenac said. “This is an opportunity we are privileged to be a part of. It’s our 12th build for them and we look forward to many more. This is our first Tier 4 boat, and it’s always such a pleasure to work with Bisso, a longtime customer of Main Iron Works.”

Founded in 1947, Main Iron Works specializes in the building, repair and repowering of marine vessels and barges.

--Staff Writer Dan Copp can be reached at 857-2202 or at dan.copp@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter@DanVCopp.

Houma and Thibodaux among first certified as retirement communities in state

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Houma and Thibodaux are two of the first cities in Louisiana to be officially designated as retirement communities by the state tourism commission.

The designations were awarded this week at the annual Lt. Governor’s Travel Summit in Lake Charles.

“Through a competitive and selective application process, these communities, including Thibodaux, will now receive state-level marketing support, networking opportunities and possible grant funding to help us grow our brand moving forward,” Thibodaux officials said Thursday.

Other cities now included in the program are Lafayette, Lake Charles, Natchitoches, Ruston and Lincoln Parish, Toledo Bend and Sabine Parish, and Shreveport-Bossier City.

Each was chosen under a competitive application process through the Encore Louisiana Commission, which reviewed applications for several months. It eventually selected the eight cities and parishes “that are now certified and focused on bringing retirees to enjoy their ‘encore’ at life,” the website states.

Under the new program, each retirement community has detailed retirement information on the state tourism website, LouisianaTravel.com.

Houma-Terrebonne was selected for its small town charm and easy access to city living in New Orleans. The area’s many outdoor activities, festivals, music and food are all boasted by the state.

“This specific designation was a great opportunity for both Houma Travel and (Terrebonne Economic Development Authority) to work together on a project that has an effect on both economic development and tourism,” Houma Travel Assistant Director Joey Pierce said.

Terrebonne has a wide demographic range, seeing many natives of the area stay through retirement, while newcomers are constantly flowing in especially as the oil and gas industry rebounds, he said.

“If you are born here, you’re going to want to stay here,” Pierce said. “There are a lot of intrinsic qualities people of this area love.”

Promoting the parish as a retirement community will not only help tourism by encouraging potential retirees to visit before settling down, it could also spark growth in the housing and job markets, he said.

About 20 miles north of Houma, Thibodaux also boasts a robust retirement community.

“Among the many factors that make Thibodaux an ideal retirement community are its fair taxes, recreational opportunities and healthcare facilities, which make for a second-to-none experience for all those who call this city their home,” the website states. It also notes the state-of-the-art Wellness Center at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center, the many festivals and events, and the work in the historic district by Thibodaux Main Street.

Staff Writer Julia Arenstam can be reached at 448-7636 or julia.arenstam@houmatoday.com. Follow her on Twitter at@JuliaArenstam.

 

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Congratulations to two Houma companies for being recognized on Inc.com's 5000 Fastest-Growing Private Companies list -- 5-year-old Pelican Waste & Debris, LLC ranked #318 and JJR Construction ranked #1824! Also a shout out to Walk-On's Bistreaux & Bar as the Baton Rouge-based company with a Houma location made the list as well (#1756).